2004 PSP Overview

Through the Authority, the Science Program invested in projects that are developing new knowledge about how water use and management activities interact with and affect key aquatic species and environmental processes across spatial and temporal scales. For details on the 2004 PSP topics and process please see our 2004 PSP Documents.

California Bay-Delta Authority Science Program

2004 Proposal Solicitation Package Synopsis

The goals of the Science Program are to ensure that the best possible scientific information guides decision making by CALFED Bay-Delta Program (CALFED) agencies and to provide robust and objective information about the results of CALFED actions. The Science Program is issuing this solicitation for scientific project proposals. The Science Program is part of the California Bay-Delta Authority (Authority), a State agency formed in 2003 and charged with coordinating the activities of numerous agencies to promote balanced implementation of activities that meet the goals and objectives of CALFED. The Authority is authorized to implement the Science Program and to disburse funds in the form of grants.1

Through the Authority, the Science Program is seeking to invest in projects that develop new knowledge about how water use and management activities interact with and affect key aquatic species and environmental processes across spatial and temporal scales. The geographic areas of interest are San Francisco Bay Estuary and the entire Bay-Delta system. The San Francisco Bay Estuary comprises the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta (Delta), Suisun Marsh, and San Francisco Bay; the entire Bay-Delta system includes all upstream tributaries as well as the San Francisco Bay Estuary. The Science Program is particularly interested in research on the following general topics:

  • Water Operations and Biological Resources. Studies that will improve knowledge of key aquatic species2 and how water management activities affect populations of those species across broad spatial and temporal scales ranging from upstream rivers down through the Estuary;
  • Ecological Processes and Their Relationship to Water Management and Key Species. Studies that will further develop understandings of ecosystem processes in the Delta, Suisun Marsh, and upstream rivers and their relationship to factors critical for water and aquatic species management; and
  • Performance Assessment to Improve Tools and Implications of Future Changes. Analytical frameworks that will support assessments and refined predictions of how likely future changes such as population or climate-related hydrological shifts may affect water operations, ecosystem processes, and CALFED projects.

1   See California Water Code, Sections 79420(a)(6); 79421 (j).
2   Key species include at-risk fish such as salmonids and delta smelt (with formal status under federal and/or state endangered species regulations) and native fish such as longfin smelt, Sacramento splittail, and green sturgeon.