CALFED Science Program Workshop - The Use of Artificial Propagation as a Tool for Central Valley Salmonid and Delta Smelt Conservation

An important goal of the CALFED Science Program is to provide authoritative and unbiased descriptions of scientific knowledge. To fulfill this goal, the Science Program holds workshops designed to provide a forum for discussions and the exchange of information among scientists, stakeholders, agency staff, and the public about topics important to the region.

The construction of dams and large water diversions, extensive introduction of non-native fishes and water pollution have imperiled many fish species and populations endemic to western river systems. Not surprisingly, fishery managers are increasingly raising native fishes in captivity, often with the hope of reintroducing them to habitats from which they have disappeared. Raising organisms in captivity is called artificial propagation (AP); AP has sometimes been a successful component of animal restoration strategies. However, there are well-founded scientific concerns that AP and related strategies can compromise the genetic fitness of the populations they are intended to restore.

CALFED Science Program Briefing

Can propagating delta smelt at a hatchery help save the species?

The construction of dams and large water diversions, extensive introduction of non-native fishes, and water pollution have impacted many fish species and populations endemic to western river systems. Not surprisingly, fishery managers are increasingly raising native fishes in captivity, often with the hope of reintroducing them to habitats from which they have disappeared. Can this work?




CALFED Science Program Workshop - The Use of Artificial Propagation as a Tool for Central Valley Salmonid and Delta Smelt Conservation

Thursday, July 24, 2008
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Delta Conference Room
650 Capitol Mall, 5th Floor
Sacramento, CA 95814

This meeting will be Webcast.
http://www.visualwebcaster.com/event.asp?regd=y&id=49706

Workshop Purpose

This workshop provided an opportunity for information exchange among scientists and managers who are already trying to use AP to preserve rare fishes and those planning to use AP for the preservation and reintroduction of Bay-Delta species.

A second purpose was to explore the following questions in a panel discussion:

  1. What are the pros and cons of AP as a tool in the recovery of endangered fish in the Bay-Delta system?
  2. Under what circumstances can AP be used effectively for endangered fish conservation?
  3. When should AP not be used?
  4. What kinds of fishes might be more or less amenable to a successful AP/reintroduction program?
  5. Are there alternatives to AP that should be used for endangered fish conservation?

In addition, development of an essay will be considered for publication in San Francisco Estuary and Watershed Science online journal.

Order of agenda items and listed times are subject to change.

AGENDA